Present status of medical assisted (artificial) reproduction

"With genetic manipulation, cloning and other devilish things like that you will have children by going directly to the clinic without going through the bedroom and you will choose them on an illustrated brochure".
— Clodimiro Mancini

In the "devilish things" mentioned by Professor Mancini are certainly included the medically assisted fertilization techniques. But let us look more closely at these "devilish things".

The scientific techniques of medically assisted artificial reproduction are about ten, but the most used is known as FIVET, which is the administration of synthetic hormones for the ovarian stimulation, followed by the instrumental collection of oocytes and fertilization in vitro with sperm previously collected through self masturbation and subsequent transfer of the embryo in the uterus.

The universally recognized technological risks of artificial medically assisted reproduction include:

  1. Effects from medications, especially hormones.
  2. Local irritation.
  3. Allergic reactions.
  4. Abnormal ovarian hyperstimulation.
  5. Altered permeability and liquid extravasation.
  6. Multiple pregnancies.
  7. Ectopic pregnancies.
  8. Surgical and anaesthetic complications.
  9. Increased risk of foetal and newborn abnormalities

Some of these risks can even be so severe as to require immediate hospitalization and even threaten the life of the woman. But this is not surprising if you think that at the present state of scientific knowledge:

  • Little or nothing is known about the natural processes that set in motion ovulation.
  • Little or nothing is known about why only one group of follicles is selected by nature for fertilization.
  • Little or nothing is known about the duration of survival of the eggs in the fallopian tubes.
  • Little or nothing is known about the mechanism of transport of sperm towards the fallopian tubes.
  • Little or nothing is known about why millions of sperm must be produced and have to die if only one or two are needed for fertilization.
  • Little or nothing is known about why some sperm are capable of fertilization and others are not.
  • Little or nothing is known about why in some patients the varicocele causes male infertility and in others not.
  • Little or nothing is known about how the embryo is implanted in the uterus and what happens in the uterine cavity.
  • Little or nothing is known yet on the participation of the pineal gland in the process of reproduction.
  • Little or nothing is known why the success of reproduction depends on the exact timing of the hormones reaching the target organs of reproduction.
  • Little or nothing is known about the interaction between hormones, neurotransmitters, enzymes and other important molecular complexes, before reaching their receiving target structures.
  • Little or nothing is known about the intermittent mechanism (pulsatile) in which certain hormones, the so-called GnRH, are released and set in motion.
  • Little or nothing is known about the cyclical variations in production and secretion of hormones and other substances with which they interact.

In addition, the artificial in vitro fertilisation (I. V. F.), even today, presents important limitations and has proved to be of little benefit in the following cases:

  1. Advanced age, especially after 35 years.
  2. Poor sperm quality.
  3. Various organic diseases of reproductive organs.
  4. Failure to implant the embryo in the uterus.
  5. Lack of a properly equipped laboratory or/and of a sufficient qualified staff..

It seems that the whole act of procreation, is a mysterious secret that is inaccessible to human understanding and scientific research.
And so, despite the declared "progress" of the techniques of artificial reproduction, infertility progresses and remains a virgin territory for scientific research and treatment.

Faced with such limited scientific knowledge and with such confusion, it would be unthinkable and risky to use the current practice of artificial reproduction techniques, also because there are no reliable long-term studies, about the influence of the artificial reproductive techniques on the physical and mental health of children born in test tubes.
In contrast,
there are sufficient reasons, to encourage therapeutic efforts towards the restoration of the lost natural reproductive functions and, in cases in which intervention of artificial reproduction may be necessary, to prepare the couple with adequate protective treatment.

9. What kind of treatment should you receive for functional infertility?

If possible try better and first to reactivate your inborn capacity to procreate. in order to avoid to make use of harmful chemical synthetic hormones and other unnatural procedures. In addition, the physiology of reproduction is so unknown and so complex that we can not exclude that other still unknown mechanisms may be involved. At the present state of our knowledge it is unthinkable that such unknown and complex mechanisms can be controlled from outside without making mistakes! Better to reactivate the natural laws of reproduction.

The treatments for infertility must bring health, not the other way around!

Hormone replacement is a routinely used method to stimulate ovulation, but hormones do not always tell the whole history of infertility. Their research and in to the blood or urine, and thus their evaluation is not stable but it continuously fluctuates in relation to the seasonal and daily rhythms imposed by Nature, lifestyle and individual state of mind present at the time of examination.
In addition, the hormones that are administered in medically assisted artificial procreation, since synthetic, are quite different from natural ones and possess significant side effects

Reactivate the laws of nature in order to use natural hormones individually planned for us.

The scientific treatments in use today are largely confined to the administration of synthetic hormones, different from those natural, and not without side effects. But it is possible that other mechanisms, still unknown to us, are involved in the complex process of procreation. One reason more to try to activate the natural mechanisms of reproduction, rather than resorting to the artificial one.
However, The physiology of reproduction is so complex and yet so unknown that we can not exclude that other mechanisms, still unknown to us, may be involved in the complex process of procreation. At the present state of our knowledge it is unthinkable that such complex mechanisms can be controlled from the outside without making any mistakes! It's better to reactivate the natural laws of reproduction.